millennials-providing-senior-care

Senior Care Trends: Millennial Caregivers

Millennials are probably not the first generation that comes to your mind when you think about the word “caregivers.” However, you may find it surprising that Millennials, ages 20 – 34, are stepping into roles as “primary caregivers” – a growing trend as their parents become “secondary” caregivers.

Furthermore, there are approximately 5.3 million grandchildren caring for their grandparents, with the average Millennial caregiver being 27 years old, male or female. This means that 1 out of 12 caregivers is caring for a grandparent!

In their new role as primary caregivers, Millennials are handling all of the responsibilities that come along with providing their grandparents’ senior care.

Why is this happening?

Let’s take a look at the most common reasons Millennials are stepping in to give senior care:

Compassion and Support

Millennials are all about providing support for their grandparents, simply because they are compassionate towards the older members of their family.

Deceased Parents/Grandparents

Often times, Millennials will step in as the primary caregiver because of the death of a parent or grandparent who otherwise may have been in the role.

Reciprocal Relationships

It is natural for Millennials to reciprocate a relationship with their grandparents – They want to provide senior care because their grandparents once took care of them as a child. They like being able to spend this time with them because they will miss their grandparents once they are gone.

Below are the primary ways Millennials are providing senior care for their grandparents:

Creating a Bond

Millennials feel it is important to bond with their grandparents, so they will often send mail to keep in touch. When visiting, they will take time to learn the hobbies and interests of their grandparents so they can continue passing them on as a tradition.

Running Errands and Assisting in the Home

As we age, driving, running errands, and other simple tasks become harder to do. That’s where Millennials are stepping in to help transport their grandparents or complete these tasks for them. They also contribute to household chores, like cleaning, cooking, paying bills, sorting mail, and hygiene.

Even though Millennials are content with providing senior care, they can still become burnt out in the role as primary caregiver. At this stage in life, many Millennials are still focusing on other thing things – Friends, school, careers – and so caregivers must sacrifice. Still, Millennials need support as well.

This is where we come in. Home Care Assistance helps to take on these responsibilities for caring for grandparents. With our customized programs that are tailored to fit your senior’s needs, we may just be the perfect fit for your family. To schedule a consultation and learn about your options, please give us a call!

paying for in home care

Will Medicare Cover Your In Home Care?

What happens after you leave the hospital but additional help is necessary at home? In some situations, Medicare will cover in-home care which can spare you of further costs or expenses.

Of course, some in-home care is likely to be needed when you’re ill or recovering from an illness and extra help might also be required after surgery. You may require skilled nursing, physical therapy, or some other medical service. With Medicare, it’s possible you may be able to recover at home instead of a nursing home, but it doesn’t help with every type of in-home care, or in every instance it is needed.

In-home care:  medical vs. non-medical

When you need in-home care for yourself or a loved one, it’s imperative to understand the difference between medical and non-medical when requesting assistance. This makes a big difference when it comes to Medicare coverage. Keep in mind that your care will have to be ordered by your attending physician.

Medical care: If your doctor orders medical care and you qualify for the home health benefit, you’ll have coverage for a limited time, for in-home skilled nursing care, rehabilitative therapy, medication administration, medical-social services, and specific medical equipment.

Non-medical care: If your doctor says you need non-medical care, Medicare typically won’t cover it. They don’t pay for personal home services such as bathing, dressing and exercise, meal planning or preparation and delivery, housekeeping, shopping, transportation, companion service, and telephone safety checks. Although these may be vitally important, they are usually not covered.

Back to the question: Does Medicare cover in-home care or not?

Medicare Part A and/or Part B may help pay for some, or all, of your in-home care if:

  1. Your doctor accepts Medicare assignment.
  2. You need special medical equipment to make it possible to leave home. Your doctor must certify that you’re homebound.
  3. A doctor orders in-home care for the patient, certifying that there is a need for intermittent skilled in-home care, but not continuous care.
  4. A physician has seen you in person to confirm that you earnestly need specialized in-home care.
  5. You are able to obtain services from a Medicare-certified home health agency.

In summary, in-home care may be covered by Medicare, but only if skilled nursing services, besides personal care, are needed.

How Home Care Assistance of [hca_city] Can Help

Home Care Assistance of Carmel is a private pay in home care provider. This means that we do not accept Medicare. Most home care services are excluded from Medicare coverage, so we are dedicated to finding an affordable, flexible care plan that is right for your loved one. Contact us for a free consultation to review your in home care options.

Exhausted nurse in low lighting in Carmel, IN

How Caregiver Burnout Damages Our Brains

What is caregiver burnout or syndrome? Can it be prevented?

Work-related stress and burnout is frequently studied and talked about, but not too much has been studied specifically to caregiver burnout. Yet, it appears that it may be more than just stressful. It can have an impact on the brain, as well.

Caregiver Burnout

Why would there be stress from caring for someone you love? Work-related stress is often acknowledged, but is it true that a caregiver can end up with damage to one’s own brain from caring for someone else? The following describes how family caregiving really can create problems for the brain, and information follows as to what can be done to prevent it, too.

What Does Caregiver Burnout Look Like?

A family caregiver’s burnout may be recognized by the same symptoms of other types of stress and depression. The symptoms can vary, and include exhaustion, anger, social withdrawal, lack of appetite, weight control issues, sleep problems, extreme fatigue, digestive concerns, lowered immune function, and more. Although you won’t find “Caregiver Syndrome” listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, healthcare professionals often use this term when describing caregiver burnout and its negative effects.

An interesting post entitled, “The Effects of Caregiver Stress on the Body and Brain,” on the Alzheimer’s Care Resource Center website reports that caregiving often has a major impact on one’s overall physical health, especially when the caregiving lasts for extended periods of time.

The degree of burnout symptoms may be connected to the individual’s genetic traits, education, financial circumstances, and even previous mental conditions. With roughly 70% of caregivers suffering from depression, smart caregiving stress management must start with a self-monitoring and awareness. One must be aware of any developing symptoms, so things can be improved quickly. Just as with other chronic stress, caregiver burnout can harm the brain. Stress can trigger a chemical change in the brain that negatively impacts memory capacity and even decreases learning abilities.

Situational Versus Long-Term Stress

The role of caregiving can be challenging and is likely to test anyone’s emotions and psyche. Even short-term stress can make people irritable, anxious, tense, distracted and forgetful, but it can get worse from there. When caregivers deny their negative emotions, stress hormones (cortisol) levels can greatly increase and these elevated levels may, unfortunately, impact one’s physical, emotional and mental health in negative ways. Research on caregiver risks shows effects on immune and endocrine functioning, depression, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease and even risk of death. A Huffington Post article recently warned that severe life events may “harm your brain’s memory and learning capacity by reducing the volume of gray matter in brain regions associated with emotions, self-control and physiological functions.” Stated in plain words, chronic stress may shrink the brain.

Tips for Handling Caregiver Burnout Before It Damages your Brain

When you find stress levels climbing, consider improving your brain power with some common sense remedies offered by the Mayo Clinic:

Accept help. Take a break when it’s offered. Make an ongoing list of things that friends and family or a healthcare professional could help you with – anything from running errands, buying groceries, cooking meals, light housekeeping or simply spending time with the person you are caring for, so you can have a respite.

Take care of yourself. Chances are you are doing a fantastic job caring for your aging loved one, so don’t allow feelings of guilt to paralyze you. Don’t go for perfection. Just do your best and take care of yourself, too.

Perform a reality check. Caregivers often do too much and run themselves ragged with almost superhuman efforts. Set ample time aside to get yourself organized and go after small realistic goals. This is also a great time to learn to say “no.”

Research community resources. Once you have completed a list of your needs, search for local resources that may be available to help. You might even find a class relevant to your situation or perhaps, there may be a local support group that will help you feel like you’re not alone. Sometimes services like transportation, meal prep or delivery, and housekeeping are the answer.

Self-care. Don’t lose view of your own personal health goals. Are you getting enough sleep? Don’t leave out exercise. Eat healthy and drink enough fresh water. Don’t neglect visits to your own doctor.

Respite Care May Help

Often, giving yourself (and your brain) a break from the daily grind is the best thing you can do for yourself, so consider respite care. Respite care is defined as the temporary care of a dependent person, so that their regular caregiver has some time to recuperate and recover. Sometimes this involves in-home respite, when a professional will assist with your loved one, so you can take time to relax for a bit. Sometimes an aide provides short-term assistance while a caregiver takes a nice mini-vacation or simply spends the day taking time for walking or bicycling outdoors. Enjoying social time by visiting with friends may be just what is needed for feeling refreshed and recharged.

A family caregiver has an important and challenging task. If you are a caregiver, remember to take care of yourself and keep stress managed as much as possible. If you feel like you’re experiencing symptoms of burnout, don’t hesitate to ask for help. The best way to care for someone you love is often to look after yourself first.

How In-Home Care Can Benefit Seniors in Carmel, IN

5 Benefits of In-Home Care for Seniors

If you have a senior that you love, then you may feel that you are facing some very tough choices concerning his or her long-term care. For many families, turning to a trusted Indianapolis home care agency can help. In addition to giving families some peace of mind, Indianapolis in-home care benefits seniors in the following ways.

1. Allows Seniors to Remain at Home

Numerous research studies show that seniors who remain at home live longer and lead more active and productive lives. They enjoy better mental health because the things that they love surround them. They have lovingly built the home, and it is where most want to stay.

2. Offers Individualized Care Plans

When seniors are admitted to a nursing home, they often become a number to the people that work there. Unfortunately, the demands of staff are so great that they do not usually have the time to cater to each person’s unique needs. When a senior is cared for by and in-home Indianapolis caregiver, he or she is the only one that the caregiver has to look after. This means that the level of personalized care naturally increases.

3. Boosts Quality of Life

Seniors have so much that they will willingly share when given the opportunity. Home caregivers have the time to focus on their stories and what elderly clients want to do. By keeping seniors mentally and emotionally stimulated, they enjoy a better quality of life.

4. Encourages Socialization

Families often benefit just as much from Indianapolis respite home care as their senior loved ones. Instead of spreading themselves too thin, families can take time to focus on their own needs. Additionally, when the family gets to spend time with their loved ones, they can plan a fun activity instead of focusing on daily tasks and chores.

5. Offers Companionship

Home care agencies can provide a reliable safety net for families. While they are never allowed to diagnose or treat a person they are taking care of, they can spot when something is not right and notify the proper people. 

There are many reasons that in-home care may be best for your loved one. Learn how Home Care Assistance of Indianapolis will benefit you and your senior loved one by calling (317) 581-1901 today. Our experienced Care Managers will happily answer all of your questions and schedule a complimentary in-home consultation.